Sunday, May 17, 2015
Conceived in Incest: Why I cannot remain silent on the 20 week fetal pain bill…
By Kristi Hofferber

Define pain…  Is it the act of being torn limb from limb, or maybe it is the act of being discriminated against?  This question remains at the center of a nationwide hot topic issue surrounding abortion in America.  Unfortunately with the piece of legislation known as H.R. 36, those of us who are conceived in rape or incest will feel the pain in both instances.  This bill, if passed, will seek to minimize abortion after 20 weeks gestation for the unborn under the premise that they can feel pain at or after this state in the womb.  But wait, there is a caveat.  If the woman claims rape, or that she is the victim of incest, she receives a free pass.  She is then able to obtain the abortion up until the day of delivery if she so chooses.  So how is the H.R 36 a step forward?  This sends the wrong message to women who need support and compassion in these situations, not an excuse to potentially bring themselves further trauma and the loss of their unborn child, not to mention that we (those of us conceived in rape or incest) feel pain too at this state of gestation. 
My personal story has been shared many times in the pro-life realm, but do people really understand the situation?  There were six children conceived between my biological mother and her own father, four of which tragically lost their lives to abortion to conceal his criminal actions.  These children were given the death penalty for the crime of our biological father.  This hardly seems like justice!  In fact, the law allowed this “opportunity” for our biological father to cover his crimes, and ensure that the evidence was “taken care of.”  So then what for his daughter, our biological mother?  First and foremost, the abuse should have never happened. Secondly, no one batted an eye when my biological father took her time and time again to the same abortion clinic.  So who is being protected by legislation that includes a rape and incest exception?  We are providing the rapist with the ultimate escape!  Why then would we tout this legislation as progress when the victims are legally allowed to be victimized yet again? 
I am the only surviving child of this horrific situation.  I was adopted at birth, grew up in nurturing and stable home, and I am now finishing my master’s degree in social work to further extend my abilities to help these women and children.  I know that my life is not in vein, and I will stand firm in support of legislation that defends 100% of unborn children in America.  The pro-life movement needs more organizations and individuals who are willing to put it all on the line and stand boldly against this type of discriminatory legislation.  We need to be firmly united in support of laws that do not defile an entire class of children, and hold our legislators accountable from the start.  As American citizens we do not accept discrimination between one race over another, so then why should we allow it with the lives of the unborn who are the most vulnerable of our population?  If abortion was illegal in cases such as rape and incest in this country, my birthmother would not have endured over twenty years of abuse by her own father.  Standing for what is right, especially when it comes to innocent lives, is crucial to gaining ground and ending abortion in our country.  Are you willing to take a stand for what’s right, or are you going to defend legislation that further harms women, punishes a child with death because of the crimes of his or her father, and allows the criminal to walk away unscathed?  I am not willing compromise the value of your life, why should the value of those of us conceived in rape or incest be any less?
To learn more about Kristi’s story, follow her on Facebook at Kristi Hofferber, Pro-life Speaker, or at  Kristi is the wife of a pastor, and together they have one son.  She speaks nationally and internationally on the importance of “no exceptions” in pro-life issues, and she is a founding member of Living Exceptions.